Lance Armstrong

Born to race a bike - ask Lance Armstrong's competitors and teammates and they would say he was. His grace in the saddle and powerful pedal strokes make his two feet on solid ground seem almost unnatural. But to get to two wheels he first had to tread a little water, literally. In his teen years, Lance was a top swimmer and triathlete until the U.S. Cycling Federation saw the phenom from Plano, Texas on a bicycle. His triathlon career soon ended, and at 17 he was training with the Junior National Cycling Team.


Topics

Adventurers, Bicycling, Goal Setting, Inspirational, Sports/Athletics


Full Bio


Born to race a bike - ask Lance Armstrong's competitors and teammates and they would say he was. His grace in the saddle and powerful pedal strokes make his two feet on solid ground seem almost unnatural. But to get to two wheels he first had to tread a little water, literally. In his teen years, Lance was a top swimmer and triathlete until the U.S. Cycling Federation saw the phenom from Plano, Texas on a bicycle. His triathlon career soon ended, and at 17 he was training with the Junior National Cycling Team.

After fitting in high school graduation between a trip to the Junior World Championships in Moscow and signing with the Subaru-Montgomery pro/amateur racing team, Lance began meeting the racing world's expectations. After winning the U.S. Amateur Championships, Motorola, the top U.S. cycling team, enlisted him into the world of international cycling. The Texan soon established himself in professional racing, pulling Motorola to a No. 5 ranking in 1993. Lance was not only winning races, but winning with an aggressive, fearless style that solidified his reputation as a confident, brash young racer who proved himself on the race course every day. The next three years saw Lance become a true force in international cycling, as well as the top U.S. racer.

In 1996 Lance started the season strong, winning another Tour DuPont and the Fleche Wallone. But in the year he was predicted to win his first Tour de France, Lance's strength and competitive spirit would be tested in ways no race had ever tested him before. In October he was diagnosed with an advanced form of testicular cancer: it had spread to his abdomen, lungs, and his brain. Given a 50 percent chance of survival, Lance was faced with the challenge of his life. He faced this challenge like any other - head on, attacking it like a mountain pass in the Tour de France. Miraculously, after a year of aggressive surgery and chemotherapy, Lance was declared cancer-free in 1997.

Lance's reaction? "This past year has been the greatest of my life." Now, a year of pain, chemotherapy, and fear doesn't sound like the greatest of anyone's life, but Lance Armstrong has gained a perspective earned only after enduring an experience like his. He is now motivated not only to win bike races, but to compete every day for the gift of life - his own life as well as the lives of others. Following his diagnosis, Lance formed the Lance Armstrong Foundation for Cancer, capitalizing his high profile position to become a spokesperson in the fight against cancer.

Now Lance has a new challenge - to mount one of the greatest comebacks in sports history. So far he is well on his way. Wearing a United States Postal Service jersey, Lance is again earning victories in the U.S. and in the European racing circuit, making his story even more compelling and inspiring. It is a story not only of athletic performance, but also one of great human courage. As we watch Lance race each day, we see that the story is far from over...

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