Dirk Hayhurst

When minor league pitcher Dirk Hayhurst started taking notes about his life, he thought his baseball career was over. Writing a book would be his way of salvaging something from years of anonymity and a lifetime spent chasing a dream. Little did he know that writing the book would coincide with career revival and a new life in the majors.


Topics

Baseball, Sports/Athletics


Full Bio


Listen to Dirk Hayhurst being interviewed on the radio.

When minor league pitcher Dirk Hayhurst started taking notes about his life, he thought his baseball career was over. Writing a book would be his way of salvaging something from years of anonymity and a lifetime spent chasing a dream. Little did he know that writing the book would coincide with career revival and a new life in the majors.

Former major league catcher and current Fox Sports broadcaster Tim McCarver says, “After many minutes, hours, days, weeks, months and years spent in the bullpen, I can verify that this is a true picture of baseball.”

NBC sportscaster Bob Costas says it’s “a bit of Jim Bouton, a bit of Jim Brosnan…a bit of Crash Davis and a whole lot of Dirk Hayhurst. Often hilarious, sometimes poignant.”

And according to ESPN baseball analyst Tim Kurkjian, “Dirk Hayhurst has written a fascinating, funny and honest account of life in the minor leagues. I loved it. Writers can’t play baseball, but in this case, a player sure can write.”

The 28-year-old Hayhurst, a Canton native and graduate of Canton South High School, pitched for Kent State University from 2000 to 2003. The right-hander was drafted by the San Diego Padres in the 8th round of the 2003 draft and spent four years in the minors before being called up to the Padres in August 2008. He was claimed off waivers by the Blue Jays in October that year, but was released four months later before the season started and re-signed to a minor league deal.

After joining the Jays in June 2009, Hayhurst compiled a 0-0 record with a 2.78 ERA in 15 appearances. His 2010 season is on hold because of shoulder surgery in February. He’s currently on the 60-day disabled list and is expected to miss four to six months of the season.

Hayhurst began his writing career by penning articles for Canton’s The Repository and for BaseballAmerica online. His followers on Twitter are treated to both serious comments and whimsical remarks about the Hayhurst-created Garfoose, an imaginary, fire-breathing creature that’s half moose, half giraffe.

Search Speakers


 

Contact Us